BOLLYWOOD WITH A BANG..

band and video - Exeter - photo Tom Hurley

In the lead up to one of the most hotly anticipated film festivals the country stages, I have had the pleasure of speaking to Rabab Ghazoul, the WOW Women’s Film Club co-ordinator.  Rabab has been an integral driving force in the exciting Best of Bollywood Live, so it was an absolute delight to speak to her about the inspiration for the event, what she thinks is missing from the Bollywood culture in Cardiff and what we can expect for the future of this type of bespoke event.

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What was the inspiration for setting up the Bollywood Brass Band event?

The inspiration was wanting to do things a bit differently. I’d been running the WOW Women’s Film Club for years, and whilst a huge amount of women access our screenings at Chapter Arts Centre, I wanted to somehow combine and cross fertilise some of our audiences who wouldn’t normally come across each other: our Film Club members, the wider audiences who use Chapter Arts Centre, as well as people who might not use either Chapter or the Film Club. So the idea was to organise a pop-up screening in our of our faith/cultural communities, and try and invite ALL of these different potential audiences along to enjoy an exciting evening of film, but to do so within this very mixed environment.

Often we develop ‘tailored’ arts provision for ‘marginalised’ groups, and that’s all very well, but I felt that the future of really meaningful ‘access’ was to create cultural spaces that were increasingly inhabited by wider cross-sections of the community…not just those ‘targeted’ groups. I believe the more we mix, and experience culture together, the wider our sense of connection to community.

So within this ‘pop-up’ framework, the Bolllywood Brass Band seemed like the perfect vehicle for such an evening: something a bit different for the Hindu Gujarati community who were hosting the event, a chance for our usual Film Club (female!) members to take part in something that the whole family could attend (guys welcome too!), and something the wider Chapter Arts Centre audiences could take to! Given that our Gujarati hosts are cooking incredible food for everyone that evening, we thought, this is a great way to experience film within an authentically community setting!

Do you think that Cardiff has a sufficient amount of events / activities focused on the Bollywood culture; also do you think Cardiff has enough focused on women’s only events? 

It’s hard to tell whether we have enough Bollywood events, I’m not sure, but I certainly think there’s room for more. Within Asian communities themselves, there’s often all kinds of activities and events going on, no doubt including Bollywood inspired culture, but we rarely hear about these things. I know that for example Asian communities, in Cardiff and elsewhere, often go to Bollywood films that are put on at the big multi-plexes, or else book somewhere like Chapter Arts Centre for a special Bollywood screening, but it tends to be for that community so understandably, we don’t get to hear about it although I think it would be great! I think in a way that’s why we wanted to open out the Bollywood experience a bit to loads more people…

As far as women’s events are concerned, some people say to me…Really? Do we really need women-only spaces nowadays? And I tend to answer, well just ask the women who come! Our Film Club members absolutely argue for these spaces, for a chance for women to get together, have time out, meet each other, leave their kids in the creche and watch a film, unwind. It’s easy to take these things for granted, but many women simply don’t get a chance to do that or for that matter can afford it. Many of the women who come to the Film Club experience isolation of different kinds, we have women rom reguges, or asylum seeking women, or women who go for long periods without mixing with other people. So yes women’s spaces are important. And I think these spaces do exist in different ways across the city, perhaps we don’t have as many cultural events tailored for women, and that’s why the Film Club addresses a real need. 

Do you hope to go on to hold more of this type of event after WOW?

Yes we’d love to. We think the pop-up programme is a really vibrant part of what we have to offer. And whilst championing women’s spaces, lots of men often say to us, can you include us too please!! The pop-up events are a way to really open out to audiences, men, women, families, and a range of different communities. Pop-up film events have often happened in really interesting sites and locations across the UK (a castle, a park, a barge) but it tends to be the same audiences, just moving from an arts space over into a site-specific space or location. These pop-ups, located in the heart of cultural and faith communities, are about not just interesting spaces or locations, but really opening out, as communities, to each other.

What do you want audiences to take away from them after the event?

Well, to have a fantastic, inspiring, joy-filled time! If people aren’t familiar with the Hindu temple Samaj community centre, to leave feeling they’ve had a warm welcome and a taste of a community’s culture that’s right on their doorstep. And I suppose to really feel it’s been a great opportunity to experience something new, something fun, with a whole load of people we haven’t met before!

How difficult was the process of setting up this event… has it been in the pipeline for a long time?

It’s taken a while, things move in fits and starts as with everything. The challenges are funding a project like this, it costs a lot to bring an entire brass band outfit from London to Cardiff! So setting up isn’t so much difficult, it’s just events like this are different, logistically a little more complicated, and rely on us getting audiences in! We really need people to attend so we can break even basically, otherwise, there are serious questions over whether we can host things like this again. But we’re hoping to get a good crowd. That’s what makes the hard work all worth it!

Can audiences expect any surprises from the event?

I suppose if you haven’t experienced Bollywood before, that will an eye opener – over 15 classic, iconic Bollywood scenes from famous movies of the last 100 years. To be honest, the surprise as far as I’m concerned is the Brass Band aspect!! I’m trying to imagine how this will sound, the Bollywood given the brass band treatment! It’s fusion at its wildest! There might also be some other surprises in store, but it wouldn’t be a surprise if we told you!

Bollywood Brass Band

Thank you so much to Rabab for speaking to us – to book your tickets for the event, visit the WOW website.

 

WALES WELCOMES THE BEST OF THE WORLD..

From the Best of Bollywood, to the rolling mountains of Switzerland, Wales’ travelling film festival returns this March with an inspiring feast of cinematic magic from around the globe. First brought to our attention in 2001 – thanks to the daring imagination of festival director David Gillam – Wales One World film festival has continuously challenged, excited and touched audiences all across Wales. This year, the festival promises to be bigger and better than ever before, with a diverse range of untold stories and dazzling events to rival the popularity of previous years.

Travelling between Aberystwyth Arts Centre, Chapter Arts Centre Cardiff, Clwyd Theatr Cymru Mold, Taliesin Swansea and Theatr Mwldan Cardigan, WOW 2014 brings 18 of the very best world cinema films to all parts of Wales, with exclusive events across every location.

A Story of Children and Film

A Story of Children and Film

 Kicking off on Friday 21 March until Wednesday 9 April, the festival opens at Chapter Arts Centre with the Welsh premier of A Story of Children and Film; a rich exploration of the position of children in arguably the most popular art form of our time. Drawing on scenes from some of the most recognised classics, the film is directed by the celebrated Mark Cousins, the director of Channel 4’s The Story of Film, and followed by a special Q & A session. 

Metro Manila, Sundance Film Festival 2013

Metro Manila

 But this year’s festival doesn’t stop there. Perhaps one of the most outstanding factors of WOW 2014 is the high level of work it is exhibiting, with award-winning and BAFTA nominated world cinema scattered throughout. Winner of the Audience Award at the Sundance film festival and BAFTA nominated Metro Manila promises to shock audiences with its tense and gripping thrill factor, whilst the winner of last year’s Best Documentary Prize at last year’s European film awards Winter Nomads looks to take audiences on a thought-provoking journey of discovery.

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Winter Nomads

 The ingenious work on display truly plays homage to the journey the festival has taken itself on since 2001, becoming a globally recognised and powerful event, attracting world-class talent and pulling in growing audiences year on year.

 The growing phenomenon that is WOW also means the festival can now put on bigger events, such as this years Best of Bollywood Live; a new departure for the festival thanks to a partnership between WOW and their sister project, WOW Women’s Film Club. The event will take place on Saturday 22 March with a pop-up film and live music experience at Samaj Community Centre, Grangetown. Magnificent clips of iconic Bollywood scenes accompanied by the encapsulating beat of the Bollywood Brass Band promise to transport its audience members out of the festival and into a whole new world, with a delicious array of authentic Gujarati food set to seal the evening in true style.

BBB Oslo Opera posing - photo Michelle Baracho

Bollywood Brass Band

 And that’s not all. Big or small, popular or untold, every story that the Wales One World film festival brings to its audiences illuminates our world in which we live in, from the voices of those often kept quiet. The festival brings the world a little closer to home, and takes its audience on a journey to places they may have never been. It’s innovative, expressive and utterly inspiring; and this year’s programme looks to take the festival to new heights.

 TOP FIVE

 PAPUSZA

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 An inspired evocation of a Gypsy life lost for ever, this film charts the life of Polish Roma Poet Bronislawa, full of music, despair and triumph. With strikingly beautiful black and white imagery and a tale of discovery, this film looks to linger in the audiences’ mind for years to come.

 SOMETHING NECESSARY

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 The tale of Anne, a strong-willed widow trying to piece her life back together after the civil unrest of Kenya. The film follows her life after the 2007 elections, where devastation left her widowed, her son hospitalized and her farm in tatters. Inspiring, consuming and heart-rendering; a must.

 THE SECOND DEATH

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 Something entirely different, this classy supernatural thriller is a cleverly scripted and atmospheric portrait of a twisted ghost story and a paranormal murder mystery.

 WHEN I SAW YOU

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 A powerful Palestinian drama about a rebellious young refugee on the hunt to find his Father. A touching story of people affected by the trying times around them, desperately searching for a way out.

 THE LUNCHBOX

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Quaint and subtle, this film tells the romantic tale of two mismatched personalities that have never even met. Clever, comical and charming, this delightful picture promises to put a smile on your face.

INTRODUCING… MUTLE MOTHIBE: THE SPOKEN WORD ARTIST WITH A DIFFERENCE..

This Saturday will see the first Take Over Cardiff event, a one-day taster where the city’s major cultural venues are handed over to the brightest young talent.

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As soon as I heard about the event, I was determined to get involved.  The event, run by The British Council Wales, hopes to engage young performers with their peers, showcasing new and emerging Welsh and International talent.

Kicking off at 11am at the Senedd, the event will take its audience on a journey through all the cultural hubs of Cardiff, with dance, slam poets, musicians and animators exposing their exceptional talent.

Today I met Mutle Mothibe – a South African spoken word artist – for a coffee and a chat.  Mutle will be performing at 4pm at The National Museum Cardiff… and I can’t wait to see his work first hand!

Mutle’s exceptional talent and humble personality is normally showcased as a member of Word N Sound, a spoken word arts organisation in South Africa. His work is topical, thought-provoking and innovative – and I had a fantastic time chatting to him about his inspiration, plans for Take Over and highlights of the event so far… 

Q: Can you tell me a bit more about your work – what does being a spoken word artist include?

 A: Essentially, it’s all about being a poet. However, I don’t just use the spoken word (despite the title!) – I like to incorporate different mediums of multimedia to keep the whole thing fresh and interesting. I’ve been working with Grass Roots (a charity dedicated to 16 – 25 year olds) as a part of their exhibition this Saturday at the Museum, which has been great. It’s my first time overseas – in South Africa I work as part of Word N Sound, a platform bringing together older practitioners of literature with youths, to encourage and inspire them and to give them a sense of the trajectory of a literary career. So this project is very similar, and I’m really happy to be a part of it.

 Q: What inspired you to become a spoken word artist?

 A: I have loved writing since I was in Grade 5 – back then I used it as a form of escapism and expression. It was a medium to express things I had pent up inside. Throughout University, I began to explore the performance side of the art – since then, I just seemed to become a spoken word artist professionally… 10 years and still going strong!

 Q: What does your work tend to be about?

 A: Mostly where I am in my life – be that relationships, social issues, personal struggles… in a nutshell, the things that are effecting me at that time. That’s why it is such a fantastic form of expression. I try to be really creative with the way I project this. I like to use more than just words; I fuse music, dance and images together to create a representation as a whole. This isn’t typical of spoken word artists at all. With my work, you’ll find contemporary dancers on stage, breakdancers, live singers… anything I can incorporate to make the work special.

 For this project, I have been working with 18 – 25 year olds from disadvantaged backgrounds, and have created a piece using the information I have gained from them. We have been holding work shops with them since Monday, through until this Friday at Grass Roots. On Monday, the kids weren’t as keen to get involved. But then we created a video for them (http://bit.ly/1gr0Rlu), showing them what we wanted to do. We showed them the video, and today the workshop was absolutely packed! It was an incredible sight. That shift was the nicest thing for me so far. It was a bit like coaxing the cat… we had to show them how cool it could be, and then just sat back and watched the crowds build!

 Q: Why did you want to get involved with Take Over Cardiff?

 A: I was chosen by the British Council as part of an exchange programme in South Africa. There’s a really interactive relationship here, in which artists from South Africa come to Wales to showcase their work, and vice versa. I know that the British Council would like to see this event extended in the future, and I am excited to hopefully be a part of that.

 Take Over Cardiff is a great way to connect as an artist with other artists. I am staying with two other poets – Michael from New York City and Martin from Wales. It’s fantastic as we feed off one another, and can exchange any tips or advice. It’s great fun to have three creative individuals under one roof.

 Q: Do you think events like Take Over Cardiff are important to promote the arts to a younger audience?

 A: Absolutely, but also on the flip side they expose younger artists to an older generation! We are holding our showcase at the museum – a place normally associated with older individuals. So it will be exciting to give this audience a taste of the work by young individuals from the community, and literally put the talent right in front of their faces. A lot of the kids we are working with thought you had to pay to visit the museum! So I hope this will also open a lot more doors for them in that respect, introducing them to iconic venues around the city.

 Q: What do you hope to get out of your work with Take Over Cardiff?

 A: Firstly, I hope we can create an opportuny for kids to take advantage of – there are a lot of chances waiting for them, particularly in great places like Grass Roots, that I hope we can raise awareness of. Grass Roots provides a safe place for kids to harness any artistic inspiration they have, as well as offering several free courses (such as sound and engineering)!

 For me , the whole experience – seeing how other artists carry out their work and approach their craft – is a great opportunity. All the connections I have already made makes it very worthwhile! The arts community of Wales is so welcoming, and everyone seems really happy to help. There’s a very communal feel to it all – a very different atmosphere to my work in South Africa.

 Q: What can we expect from Saturday’s showcase?

 A: Lots of surprises! When I left South Africa, I had one idea in my head. Since then, it has changed many times! The show as it is now is much more collaborative – but it is still constantly changing. There will be clips scattered throughout for people to watch, as well as break dancing, contemporary movement, live music and singing. Fundamentally, I just want to expose the audience to everything the kids can do!

 Check out Mutle’s video: http://bit.ly/1gr0Rlu 

To take a look at the work Mutle does with Word N Sound, have a look at their website.

 Find out more about Grass Roots Cardiff here.

 For more information on Takeover Cardiff visit the British Council website.

Follow them on Twitter @bcwales, Like ‘British Council Wales’ on Facebook, Hashtag: #TOC #YoungCurators.